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Literacy

Literacy

Reading, along with writing, makes up literacy, one of the four specific areas of the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS).

Reading's Early Learning Goal is:

Children read and understand simple sentences. They use phonic knowledge to decode regular words and read them aloud accurately. They also read some common irregular words. They demonstrate understanding when talking with others about what they have read.

To be ready to start reading, children need to have a variety of skills in place. These early reading skills include matching, rhyming, awareness of phonics and the skills associated with language development such as listening, attention, alliteration and sound discrimination.

Writing, along with reading, makes up literacy, one of the four specific areas of the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS).

The Early Learning Goals for writing come from both literacy and physical development. They are:

  1. Writing - children use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways which match their spoken sounds. They also write some irregular common words. They write simple sentences which can be read by themselves and others. Some words are spelt correctly and others are phonetically plausible.

  2. Moving and handling - children show good control and coordination in large and small movements. They handle equipment and tools effectively, including pencils for writing

Gross motor skills

Learning to write is closely linked to a child's physical development. Before children can control the muscles in their hands, they need to develop their gross motor skills (those that need large or whole body movements). For babies this means the freedom and space to kick, roll and crawl. And for older children this also means the chance to run, climb, balance, throw, push, pull and swing their arms.

Synthetic phonics (UK) also known as inductive phonics, is a method of teaching reading which first teaches the letter sounds and then builds up to blending these sounds together to achieve full pronunciation of whole words.

Reception Red Words

The following words are called red words. These words are high frequency words that the children need to be able to read and spell correctly by the end of the reception year. The document contains all the red words to work on with your child.

Tips for reading with your child at home

It is essential when children are learning to write letters that they start from the correct position to ensure accurate formation.

Below is a letter formation sheet to inform you of the correct letter formation expected in reception.

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